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Breast (checks) Is Best


Doctor's hands on table facing cancer patient

Breast cancer is a serious condition that affects millions of women worldwide. Although it is more common in women over the age of 40, it is important to note that breast cancer can also affect younger women.


I made two friends in Chemo, both of them were in their late 30s / early 40s and were having treatment for breast cancer. Neither of them expected to have cancer, especially not that young.


This is why we should all be checking our breasts as part of our regular routine. Set a reminder in your phone, do it on the 1st of each month, add a reminder in your cycle tracking app, get your partner involved but make sure you start checking.

If you are my friend you will also be nagged.


Performing a monthly breast self-exam is a simple and effective way to detect any changes in your breast tissue. It is recommended that you perform this exam a few days after your period ends, as your breasts may be less tender and swollen during this time.


To perform a breast self-exam, start by standing in front of a mirror with your arms at your sides. Look for any changes in the size, shape, or contour of your breasts. Check for any dimpling, puckering, or redness of the skin, and examine your nipples for any discharge or inversion.


Next, raise your arms above your head and look for the same changes. Then, place your hands on your hips and press down firmly to flex your chest muscles. This will help you see any changes in the shape or contour of your breasts.


Finally, lie down on your back and place a pillow under your right shoulder. Use your left hand to feel your right breast, using small circular motions with your fingertips. Start at the outer edge and work your way towards the nipple, checking for any lumps, thickening, or other changes. Repeat this process on your left breast.


If you notice any changes or abnormalities during your breast self-exam, it is important to contact your healthcare provider immediately. Early detection is key when it comes to breast cancer, and the earlier it is detected, the better your chances of survival.


In addition to performing regular breast self-exams, it is also important to receive regular clinical breast exams and mammograms as recommended by your healthcare provider. Women over the age of 40 are generally recommended to have a mammogram every one to two years (depending on your state or country), but women at higher risk of breast cancer may need to start screening earlier or have more frequent screenings.


Breast cancer is a serious & scary condition, it can affect women of all ages and even men. However, due to advances in medical treatment is is by no means a death sentence.

Early detection saves lives. By performing regular breast self-exams and receiving regular clinical breast exams and mammograms, you can help detect any changes in your breast tissue early on. After going through treatment for Ovarian cancer I am hypervigilant to any aches and pains, lumps and bumps in my body (hello cancer PTSD) and ensure I get everything checked if I'm seriously worried. I have also started yearly mammograms through the free service at Breast Screen Queensland.


This a a nationwide service so you have no excuse to not get checked.

Find out more & book an appointment at the links below:


Although I am only familiar with the Australian system information in other countries can be found using these links as a starting point:


If you find yourself needing to talk to someone after reading this article you can call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or The Cancer Council on 13 11 20


 

Mental Health Support for Life After Cancer

These are the products that helped me exercise during treatment.



What the F*ck Just Happened?

A Survivor's Guide to Life After Breast Cancer



Click to purchase




The Cancer Survivor Handbook

Your Guide to Building a Life After Cancer


Click to purchase

Support Resources

Cancer Council Australia

CCA an organisation to support all Australians affected by cancer through support, research and prevention programs.


Ovarian Cancer Australia

OCA is an independent national not-for-profit organisation, supporting women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Our focus is to provide care and support for those affected by ovarian cancer; and represent them by leading change. Our vision is to save lives and ensure no woman with ovarian cancer walks alone.


Breast Cancer Network Australia

BCNA Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) is Australia’s leading breast cancer consumer organisation. We have worked tirelessly to ensure that all Australians who are affected by breast cancer receive the very best care, treatment and support.


Bowel Cancer Australia

BCA Peer-to-Peer Support Network connects patient’s and loved ones on a one-to-one buddy basis that enables members to give and receive advice about their bowel cancer experience in an informal and mutually beneficial way.


Leukaemia Foundation

LF is a support service for patients and supporters dealing with blood cancers.


*FU Cancer is supported by its audience. If you choose to purchase through the links on our site we may receive an affiliate commission. This goes towards paying our expenses plus a percentage of our monthly profit goes towards directly helping people with cancer. If you know someone who could do with a boost during their cancer treatment please let us know here.



*FU Cancer is supported by its audience. If you choose to purchase through the links on our site we may receive an affiliate commission. This goes towards paying our expenses plus a percentage of our monthly profit goes towards directly helping people with cancer. If you know someone who could do with a boost during their cancer treatment please let us know here.





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